Crochet an oval tutorail

How to crochet an oval shape – without counting stitches

Ovals are everywhere in amigurumi. Thing of teddy bear’s tummies, or even the white of a fried egg! This tutorial will explain how you crochet an oval – without counting stitches!

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you’ll know that counting stitches is not my favourite thing. One, two, three… snooze. Instead, I’ve borrowed a technique which is more often seen in knitting: strategically placed markers which are “action points” and prompt you to do something. Not clear? Read on, and it will all make sense, I promise!

Because we’re crocheting amigurumi style, we’re working in spirals, without slip stitching to join rounds. As always, I’m using the US terminology. This post assumes you know how to chain, single crochet, and increase (two or three single crochets in one space). I’m using a DK yarn and a 3mm hook, because that’s often the weight I use for amigurumi (and this is an amigurumi blog!). You can use whatever weight yarn and size hook you need to get a fabric which you like.

How to create a crochet oval

  • Foundation chain – Chain a number of stitches. In the example, I’ve chained 5, but you can do as many as you want: more for a longer oval, fewer for a more circular oval.Chain five crochet stitches
  • Round 1 – Sc into the second chain from hook. Sc in every stitch until end.How to crochet an ovalSingle crochet twice more in the final stitch (3 stitches total in the final stitch).

    Mark the crochet increases with a locking stitch marker

    Pause for a moment, and mark the centre of these three stitches with a locking stitch marker. This is your ACTION STITCH and it will be important later.
    Turn the work and sc back into every chain the other side of the chain. You may notice your chain is a little ‘gap-y’. If this bothers you, rip out and go down a hook size for the chain. Or, just darn it shut when you’re finished. Single crochet three times in the final stitch. Mark the centre of these three stitches with a locking stitch marker. This is your second ACTION STITCH.

    Create a crocheted oval

  • Round 2 – sc in every stitch until one stitch before the first marked ACTION STITCH. 2 Sc in next stitch, remove marker, 3 sc in marked action stitch, 2sc in next stitch. Replace the marker in the centre of the three-stitch increase. Repeat to finish the other side of the oval.Repeat round 2 to make a crocheted oval any size you need.
  • Repeat until your oval is the desired size.

That’s it. Repeat round 2 twice more, or a hundred times more, and you’ll have a lovely crocheted oval of whatever size you want!

Crocheted oval shape

Just like in the circle, we have another pattern! This formula works because we are increasing every round. You can increase the size of this oval to make it as big as a bedspread if you like, or leave it teeny-tiny. Because it’s so flexible, you can use this formula to create any size.

What can you do with a crocheted oval?

  • Make a set of placemats for your table, in washable cotton
  • Use t shirt yarn and a 20mm hook to create a rug for the floor!
  • Stitch two ovals together for a cushion.
  • Fold an oval in half and add a clasp for a purse
  • Crochet a puddle for a toy duck to swim in
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    • Ruby
    • June 14, 2018
    Reply

    I’m going to use this for the soles of newborn booties, thank you for this “tutorial”

    • Gwen Cheng
    • June 8, 2018
    Reply

    Thanks for the great tutorial! I’d like to crochet a trash bag for my car, with one side flat (back), and a semi oval at the front (just like a protruding pocket). Please tell me how to do this.

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    • linda
    • July 4, 2017
    Reply

    love it!!!!!! so simple don’t like counting either xx

    • Doris
    • June 2, 2017
    Reply

    Thank you. I had a difficult time with an oval basket as the instructions were confusing. And I like that I can use this for other projects.

    • Nessa
    • October 15, 2016
    Reply

    Thanks for this! Have been looking for an oval that isn’t just a rounded off rectangle

      • Rachel
      • October 21, 2016
      Reply

      No worries, Nessa! I’m glad you found it helpful 🙂

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